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51 years of promoting safety in Fulda Schools

By: Norma Dittman, staff writer

December 6, 2012

Kim Hiscox, Safety Coordinator with the National Child Safety Council, and the Council’s mascot, Safetypup, presented Fulda Schools Superintendent Luther Onken with Noreen Gosch’s book Why Johnny Can’t Come Home.  
 Fulda Free Press Norma Dittman
Fulda Free Press Norma Dittman
Kim Hiscox, Safety Coordinator with the National Child Safety Council, and the Council’s mascot, Safetypup, presented Fulda Schools Superintendent Luther Onken with Noreen Gosch’s book Why Johnny Can’t Come Home.
National Child Safety Council
Kim Hiscox, Safety Coordinator with the National Child Safety Council (NCSC), West Des Moines, IA, met with Fulda Schools Superintendent Luther Onken on Thursday morning to present the book Why Johnny Can’t Come Home to the schools.

Why Johnny Can’t Come Home is the story of Johnny Gosch who was forcibly abducted in 1982 from his Iowa home and family. It is also the true story of a mother’s love that would reach out wherever she could in the desperate search to find her son.

“This book is the most important one that I have read in my career,” Hiscox stated. “It points out several different pieces of advise that will help to keep our children safe. It will be available through the Fulda High School and Murray County Central libraries.”

Besides presenting the book to Fulda Schools, Hiscox explained that that the NCSC has a 51 year history of delivering child safety materials to the Fulda School system.

“I have been visiting Fulda Schools for 31 years and my father, Dan Hiscox, visited the schools for twenty years before that,” Hiscox said.

Each year, the NCSC focuses on a particular safety subject to educate children, and their parents or guardians about. This year’s subject is “Beware and Be Ware of Dangerous People in the Community”. The new materials provide education about how to help avoid child abductions.

Hiscox referenced a letter written by B. Todd Jones, United States Attorney, District of Minnesota, when she talked about children elementary school age, middle-school age, and high school age being at risk for abduction.

The letter states, “Unforunately, it is not just middle-school or high-school cildren at risk, but children in elementary school as well. According to the National center for Missing and Exploited Children’s publication “Online Victimization of Youth: Five Years Later,” 13 percent of elementary-aged children have received some type of sexual solicitation or approach through the Internet. In Minnesota, 13 percent amounts to more than 57,000 of the 438,000 elementary-aged children. ...We hope parents, guardians, and care givers in your school district will talk about Internet safety with their children, so every child in Minnesota will be better protected from online predators.”

Throughout the past 51 years, the NCSC has provided grade-specific educational materials to every students in grades K - 6. During recent years, some of the yearly safety subjects have been Farm Safety, Internet Safety,, and Bullying.

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