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Living life in forward mode

January 1, 2014

Holly Zins, cheerfully shared her New Years Resolution, My New Years Resolution for 2014  is to be a better version of myself; to care more for the people around me, to do random acts of kindness, and to volunteer where I can.  
 FULDA FREE PRESS/Norma Dittman
FULDA FREE PRESS/Norma Dittman
Holly Zins, cheerfully shared her New Years Resolution, My New Years Resolution for 2014 is to be a better version of myself; to care more for the people around me, to do random acts of kindness, and to volunteer where I can.
By Norma Dittman
January 1, 2014. Happy New Year to you!

Are you reflecting today on the 2013 year that has just past? Many people will be. Some will be recalling memories of the good that happened over the past twelve months. Others will be thinking about events that took place that they would rather have not had happen. Either way, all will be hoping for the New Year of 2014 to deliver the presents of peace, joy, and tranquility.

Today is the day famously known for the start of New Year’s Resolutions. What is your definition of a New Year’s Resolution? With much thought, the following definition came to mind: A New Year’s Resolution is a promise to orchestrate improvements that benefit self, family, home or work - OR to cease behaviors that can be unbecoming, too time consuming or costly or even destructive.

There are 13 resolutions that are commonly made each year by American citizens. Not surprisingly, they deal with health, self-improvement, money management, and time for relaxation. The following list is from the www.us.gov/ Citizen website. It includes

•lose weight

•volunteer to help others

•quit smoking

•get a better education

•get a better job

•save money

•get fit

•eat healthy food

•manage stress

•manage debt

•take a trip

•reduce, reuse, and recycle

•drink less alcohol

Although these resolutions are pretty much self-explanatory, many of them will not be upheld. According to clinical psychologist, Guy Winch, the failure of these resolutions is not due to strength of character or will power, but because the execution of the resolutions are not well thought out. Winch says that there are five very basic, but crucial, errors that pave the way to resolution failure. He states that those errors are goal binging, vague goals, unrealistic goals, inadequate planning, and lack of timelines.

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